A wide variety of resources have been developed so that Young Athletes can be implemented in any setting. All of these resources are derived from the Activity Guide.

ACTIVITY GUIDE

A Guide for Families & Caregivers

A Guide for Families and Caregivers is an overview of how to enhance the Young Athletes experience. At Home Quick Tips offer recommendations/structure for at-home use, and Flash Cards help keep things fresh and gives the young athlete an opportunity to select the activities they are most interested in doing.

GUIDE FOR FAMILIES AT HOME QUICK TIPS FLASH CARDS

Guides & Activities

Below, you will find recommended schedules/structures for each week (using the At Home Quick Tips Card), along with resources for each specific skillset. These resources include:

  • Video: a brief video that shows what each of the activities should look like
  • Booklet: a printable document that you can fold into a book, so that you can draw/color/fill in with your young athlete, as you review the activities, and how much fun they had:
  • Card: a printable card that gives a brief overview of key activities. It can also be posted somewhere visible to serve as a reminder to play together!
  • Printable Home Workout Plan: print out the recommended schedule/structure so you can have it easily accessible! Each week also has a page where you can create your schedule/structure.
  • For Educators: Curriculum—printable lesson plans that can be used to implement Young Athletes as part of a structured classroom setting for each week. Summary Cards are also available that mirror the curriculum in one comprehensive document.

As you progress, a printable Activity Tracker can be used daily to show progress being made.

CURRICULUM SUMMARY CARDS ACTIVITY TRACKER

The recommended Schedule/Structure also uses the following fun warm-up and cool downs to keep things exciting. Feel free to find other options!

Foundational skills help children become aware of themselves and their relationship to their surroundings. They also support basic health and physical fitness. Body awareness, strength, flexibility, coordination and endurance are important for motor and social skills. Foundational skills promote development in all of these areas, which are essential for mobility at home and in school and the community.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Walking and running are skills that allow children to explore their environment. Both skills allow children to participate in a variety of recreational activities, sport games and learning experiences.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Good balance is important for many activities and sports. Balance helps children climb stairs and walk on uneven surfaces, like grass or sand. Good balance will help develop confidence for jumping and leaping.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Trapping is when children stop a ball with their body and not their hands. Catching is when children use only their hands to stop a ball that is thrown, bounced or rolled. Both skills require children to watch the ball as it moves and handeye coordination. Children also need strength and balance to trap and catch.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Throwing requires strength, flexibility, balance and coordination. Children learn how to grip and let go of an object by tossing something small and light. If a child can easily lift a ball over their head with two hands, the ball is a good size. Throwing is important in many sports. Being good at throwing helps children feel comfortable joining in games with friends.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Striking means hitting a ball or object with one’s hand or with an object, like a stick, bat, paddle or racket. Striking helps develop the hand-eye coordination skills needed for tennis, golf, softball, volleyball and floorball.

Video Booklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Kicking describes when an object is hit with the foot. Kicking requires eye-foot coordination. It also requires the ability to balance, at least for a moment, on one foot. Being able to kick a ball is important for football (soccer), and allows children to play with others.

VideoBooklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum

Advanced sports-specific skills require children to use the skills they have developed earlier in the Guide and put them into a sports context. This requires a high level of connection, strength, power, coordination, teamwork and awareness.

VideoBooklet Card Printable Workout Plan

Educators Resource

Curriculum